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In the archive of the Central Passport Office there are around 60 copies of the Nansen passport issued by the office in the period 1922-1928. In other words, not many of the former subjects of the Tsar sought refuge in Norway.

Caption: Stamp from 1932 in residence permit issued by Aker police station, 3dje sivilktr.G, Statsborgerskapssak 4740/1935 G, Ivan Prokaroff Olianoff

Stamp from 1932 in residence permit issued by Aker police station, 3dje sivilktr.G, Statsborgerskapssak 4740/1935 G, Ivan Prokaroff Olianoff

At the League of Nations’ passport conference in Geneva May 12th-18th 1926 it was decided to introduce a stamp with the photo of Fridtjof Nansen and with a reference to the resolution of May 12th 1926. At the same conference, a stamp fee was passed, equivalent to 5 gold francs. The income was to go to refugee help. However, we have not found any stamp used before 1928 in the National Archives. From then on the stamp is glued to the refugee’s residence permit.

The shown Nansen passport is issued in Vienna June 17th 1928, and follows closely the League of Nations’ recommendations from 1922. Alexandra Borodine came to the country on June 20th 1929. A Nansen passport normally had to be renewed every second year. Borodine’s was valid until July 16th 1929, and by contacting the Austrian consulate general in Oslo, she was told that she could not renew her Nansen passport there. The 24 year old woman from Archangel reported that she had come to Norway via Switzerland, that her husband was in Austria and that she planned to go to Belgium in three weeks’ time. Nothing else has been recorded on her.



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